Our Blog

DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

Here’s our latest blog:

 

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Now’s the time to plan your 529!

Written by Ginny Wilson.

chillin in sumeerSummmerrrtttime!  Every day in the summer at our office here in Charleston, we are regaled with the carriage tour drivers’ versions of this famous song from Porgy & Bess.  We end up having that song stuck in our head a lot of the time!  Already the ads for back to school sales are appearing and it reminds us that, while the “livin’ is easy” right now, the hustle of getting kids ready to head back to school isn’t far away.  We hate to interrupt your summer fun, but it is a good idea to get ready for college tuition payments no matter what age those students are!

We wanted to highlight the particular advantages of using 529 plans for funding your education purposes, as it is the most cost-effective way to manage the expenses of higher education.  Enacted in 1996, Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Service Code allows an account owner to establish a plan to pay for a beneficiary’s qualified higher education expenses using two types of plans – a pre-paid tuition program or the more popular, state-administered college savings plan.  The beneficiary can be a family member or friend or an owner can set up a 529 account for their own benefit.  Anyone can then donate to the account, regardless of the owner or beneficiary.  Funds can be deposited and used almost immediately (need to wait 10 days) or can be invested and grown until needed.  Surprisingly, according to a Wall Street Journal article recently, only 14% of Americans plan to use 529s to pay for college.

Although there is no allowable federal tax deduction for 529 contributions, the income and gain in the account are not taxable, as long as they are used for qualified education expenses.  These qualified expenses include tuition, room & board, books and, in a 2015 legislative change, payments for many technological expenses like a computer, printer or internet access, even if not specifically required by the educational institution.  The costs for off-campus housing can also qualify, as long as the amount used matches the average cost of resident-living at your university.  Many states, like SC and IL, also allow a tax deduction for 529 contributions to in-state plans.  Another recent legislative change allows for an increase from one to two annual investment selection changes per year, unless there is a rollover and then a change can be made at that time.  This gives the 529 owner a little more benefit, flexibility and control over their accounts.

When funding 529 accounts, we recommend that our clients not fund more than 50% of the total cost of estimated expenses for the education of their student before the student selects and starts college.  One nice feature about 529 plans is that they are transferrable to a sibling or other close family member, if a student doesn’t use or exhaust their entire 529 account.    However, you don’t want to overfund an account and then have some leftover.  Only the gains in the account are taxed, but there is a 10% penalty on the account if the funds are withdrawn and not used for qualified education expenses.  Another reason for not overfunding is that there are many scholarships available – you may have an accomplished science whiz or an amazing athlete that earns scholarship money.  Once final amounts of tuition requirements are determined, 529 account owners can make necessary additional contributions to take advantage of tax benefits. 

There are many scholarship opportunities available for those who take the time to look and apply.  Checking with the high school guidance counselor, local civic groups or community organizations about scholarships or awards opportunities can give your high school student some hands on involvement in paying for their own education!  All high school seniors should also fill out the annual FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).  There are many opportunities for earning money for college and nothing should be ruled out. 

We know that using 529 accounts is the least expensive way to pay for college.  Research shows that the most expensive way to pay is by taking out student loans or paying out of pocket as the student needs it.  At DWM, we want to help you strategize how to save for and pay for any education expenses that you may have before you, no matter when those costs are expected.  We can help you evaluate the various state plans and the investment options in the 529s and calculate an appropriate annual or lump sum amount of savings.  We will be glad to help make your summertime livin’ easy and carefree!  Okay, now back to summer fun…already in progress!

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“American Spirit and Values”

Written by Les Detterbeck.

DAzPhz4XgAATs5oDavid McCullough, Pulitzer Prize winning historian has a new book.  “The American Spirit,” is a compilation of speeches Mr. McCullough has made over the last 25 years.  His hope is to “remind us, in this time of uncertainty and contention, of just who we are and what we stand for, of the high aspirations of our founders and of our enduring values.”   Our country has always stood for opportunity, vitality and creative energy, fundamental decency, insistence on truth, and good-heartedness to one another.

However, much of what we read in the papers these days belies our American values.  Today, let’s look at two key areas- corporate America and Washington- that require substantial improvement.

First, let’s talk about today’s problem of big business focusing solely on “maximizing shareholder value.”  The result has been an almost Dickens-like atmosphere for consumers and employees. Turning airplanes into cattle cars is a good example.  We all saw the United passenger dragged off the flight in April.  United used to have a bonus program for executives based on on-time arrivals, consumer satisfaction and profit.  It doesn’t now- it’s only based on pretax income and cost savings.  Same thing for American Airlines.  After years in Chapter 11, AAL came out of bankruptcy by merging with US Airways in 2013.  Earlier this year, after finally making a profit, management awarded its long underpaid flight attendants and pilots with a raise to bring them to industry levels of compensation. Wall Street “freaked out” that some potential shareholders earnings were being diverted and AAL’s stock price tanked. 

Wal-Mart doesn’t want that to happen to them. Seven Walton family members (with a net worth of $130 billion) own ½ of WMT.  In 2015, WMT made $14.7 billion and shareholders got $10.4 billion in dividends and stock repurchases. WMT’s “low, low prices” are in part made possible by low, low wages for its 1.5 million employees. Many full-time WMT employees live in poverty, without enough money to pay for an apartment, buy food, or get basic health care. And, each year, we taxpayers pay $153 billion to pay for food stamps and other welfare programs for low paid employees, with WMT employees receiving about $7 billion of it.  WMT’s CEO made $21.8 million last year. The median annual pay for CEOs of the S&P 500 companies is now $11.7 million.

The real issue with low wages is the impact on the overall economy.  One company’s workers are another company’s customers.  Profitable companies could pay workers more and shareholders less, leading to more spending on products and services from other companies. This is turn could increase the revenue and profits of the overall economy.  Treating employees more fairly, giving them more opportunity and training is good for America and the economic growth and happiness of our country.  Focusing on making super products and providing excellent customer service are great.   Those aspects of capitalism are good for American.  The greed and selfishness parts are not.

Which brings us to Washington.  In less than five months, President Trump has transformed us from leaders of the free world to whiny bullies.  He pulled us out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, refused to reaffirm the mutual defense commitment to NATO and abandoned the voluntary Paris climate accord.  Here’s how Mr. Trump’s national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster described the President’s world view:  “The world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

Really?  Is it all about self-interest? What happened to the more cooperative, rules-based vision that motivated America and its allies since WWII?  Our leadership was good for the world and has been good for our country.  A world of cutthroat competition and zero-sum outcomes is not.

On the domestic side, the House passed the Financial Choice Act (FCA) last week.  Very disappointing.   This legislation would replace the post 2008 financial crisis Dodd-Frank regulations, designed to protect Americans.   FCA would repeal the “Volker Rule,” which restricts banks from certain types of trading, and would strip the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau of its power to write rules and supervise investment firms (particularly regarding deceptive practices and consumer complaints.)  This, like the Health Care Choice Act and proposed tax reform, is just another Congressional attempt to give Wall Street and the top 1% unfair advantages so they can keep making more money at the expense of most Americans.

History can be a strength and an inspiration- it reminds us who we are and what we stand for.  Certainly, let’s make America Great, but let’s do it the right way- working together and providing opportunities for all 321 million Americans to reach their full potential. Let’s move away from the toxic polarization, greed and selfishness we see every day and get back to the high aspirations of our founders; cooperation, vitality, energy, basic truth and decency.  And, yes, let’s “Make Our Planet Great Again” and work with almost 200 countries worldwide to mitigate global warming.  We 7.5 billion citizens of the world are all in this together, hopefully for centuries and centuries to come.  Finally, let’s remember and promote our American Spirit and Values.

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Successful Investing Strategies for Millennials

Written by Nick Schiavi.

oh-my-i-saved-too-much-for-retirement-said-nobody-ever--e5c35We have all heard how important it is to start saving for retirement at a young age; but what exactly does that mean? A lot of young working people will sock money away in a savings account and think they are doing the right thing. While having cash for a rainy day/unexpected life event is very important, it is not at all how to save for retirement or save for a big purchase (i.e. down payment on a mortgage/new car). The secret behind it all is something called “compounding interest”. Compounding interest is something that happens over the course of many years and is hands down the best strategy to obtaining financial freedom.

For starters, it is important to understand what kind of account you are funding. Ideally, funding both a qualified account and non-qualified account is important. Qualified accounts are tax-advantaged retirement accounts such as Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, and 401ks. The beauty about these accounts is that they can grow either tax-deferred (such as a Traditional IRA) or tax-exempt (i.e. Roth IRA), however they cannot be tapped until a later age without penalty. Qualified accounts also come with contribution limits so one cannot put in an indefinite amount. Although you will pay tax on earnings upon sale of investments within non-qualified accounts, the good news is that the funds are available for withdrawal at any time with no age restriction.  

We understand young workers may not be able to fund both kinds of accounts early in their careers, therefore, we recommend funding the qualified accounts (retirement) first, followed by the taxable, non-retirement accounts.

Click here to learn a little more about Roth and Traditional IRA’s (qualified/retirement accounts).

The next step is to determine what kind of asset allocation aligns with your ‘Risk Tolerance Level’. We recommend consulting an investment expert, like DWM, to help determine your risk level profile (e.g. defensive, conservative, balanced, moderate, or aggressive) and the funds you should be invested in. Assuming your risk tolerance lands you in a “balanced” portfolio, you should expect a targeted long term rate of return of 6 to 8% per year. This may not sound like an enormous annual rate of return, but after compounding interest over a long investment time horizon, one is capable of achieving impressive portfolio numbers.

Now for the magic of compounding interest, what it can mean for your future, and why it is so important to start early for young workers. The best way to explain this is through an example:

If you contribute $5,500 to a Roth IRA (the max a Roth allows each year) starting at 22 years old and average 7% return per year until retirement at age 65, the $236,500 total contribution will turn into $1,566,121.

Compare that to socking away $5,500 into the same type of account, invested in the same exact funds, starting at age 40: Your account will grow to $372,220. This is still great and much better than not investing at all, but it would be a lot nicer to grow an account to over 1.5 million dollars versus less than 0.4 million dollars going into retirement.

An accepted estimate in the financial planning world is something called “The Rule of 72”. This is a quick and simple math equation that estimates how many years it will take to double an investment, given a certain annual rate of return. If we assume a 7% rate of return, we would divide 72 by 7 to come to a final answer of 10.24. So, with an annual return of 7%, it will take you a little over 10 years to double an investment. Therefore, a 25 year-old has the potential to double his/her invested money every 10 or so years from your early 20’s until retirement (4x over).

This means one would need to more than quintuple your annual income if you wait until age 40 vs. starting at 22 to make up for not putting away the $5,500 the 18 years prior (~$1.25 million) you technically missed out on.

Click here to see what amount you can achieve if you started putting $5,500 away today.

Another big misconception with saving young is “maxing out a 401(k)”. Many young workers will say they are maxing out their 401(k). However, simply putting away the 3-4% a company matches is not at all maxing out a 401(k), in fact, it is barely scratching the surface. As of 2017, the maximum employee contribution, per year to a 401(k), is $18,000- this is maxing out a 401(k). Let’s say a 25 year old makes $50,000 per year and is contributing 4% to his/her 401(k) that the company is matching. This 4% is only $2,000 per year and the match only becomes yours after it vests. It is important to understand your companies vesting schedule because in some cases it can take six years or more for that to actually be considered your money.

Another important step to saving/investing correctly is analyzing the investment menu within your 401(k). This involves studying the funds offered within a 401(k) and identifying an appropriate asset allocation target for yourself in-line with your risk tolerance. It is also important to look at the underlying fees within the funds of the 401(k). If you are in a large cap equity fund charging 70 basis points but there is another large cap fund that charges only 9 basis points, it can make a big difference over 20-30 years. Here at DWM, we do a 401(k) analysis for all clients because we understand the importance a few basis points can have on an individual and their family over the course of a lifetime.

We have all heard our millennial generation and future generations will never be able to retire because of different theories on social security and how rare pensions are today. This could not be further from the truth. We simply need to take our savings just as seriously as our expenses and we may be capable of not only retiring, but comfortably retiring and being able to leave a legacy for future generations. While a lot of millennials believe they are going to invent the next pet rock and become overnight millionaires, it might be a good idea to start saving the correct way because slow and steady does indeed win the race. 

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