Our Blog

DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

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The “Nastiest, Hardest Problem” in Retirement

Written by Les Detterbeck.

running out of money empty wallet

 

Running out of money in retirement is, according to Nobel Prize winning economist William Sharpe, the “nastiest, hardest problem” in retirement. Professor Sharpe has spent his career thinking about risk. His work on the Capital Asset Pricing Model and systemic risk produced in 1966 the Sharpe ratio, which measures risk-adjusted returns. Now, he’s tackling a much broader subject, extremely important to everyone, about possibly outliving your money in retirement. Similar to the Monte Carlo analysis that DWM uses to provide a probability of success for your financial plan, Dr. Sharpe created a computer program with 100,000 retirement-income scenarios to calculate the probability of not running out of money. He’s published a free 730 page e-book “Retirement Income Scenario Matrices.”

In short, there are three key variables that impact your retirement income; your spending, your investment returns and your eventual age (when your plan “ends.”)

The first variable, spending, is the one you can most control. Your spending before retirement will generally determine how much money you accumulate while working. What you don’t spend becomes savings/investments and these annual additions and their appreciation increase your investment portfolio overtime. Your spending in retirement will determine how much you need to withdraw from your investment pot. As your earnings during the working years increase, you need to save a larger percentage of your income in order to accumulate an investment pot at retirement time that will support the lifestyle you’ve created. Withdrawals from your investment portfolio during retirement typically should not exceed 4% of the total investment pot. It’s an easy calculation. For example, if you determine you will need to withdraw $100,000 from the portfolio in your first year of retirement, you’ll need a portfolio of $2.5 million.

Now let’s look at investment returns. No one can predict the future. Historically, we know there is a relationship between inflation, asset allocation and returns. Hypothetically, let’s assume that a diversified fixed income portfolio over the long term would produce a return of 1% above inflation. The return above inflation is called the “real return.” Equities, because of their higher risk, have earned an “equity risk premium” of roughly 3 to 7% above the inflation rate over the long term. Again, hypothetically, let’s assume that in the long-run equities earn 5% above inflation. Alternatives have a shorter historical track record but are designed to produce returns comparable to fixed income returns over time. Therefore, a portfolio with 50% fixed income holdings and 50% equity holdings might hypothetically produce a 3% real return over time. If long-term inflation is expected to be 2.5%, the nominal return could be expected to be 5.5%. A larger allocation to equities will likely produce a larger real return and a smaller (more defensive) allocation of equities would likely produce a smaller real return.

Lastly, longevity. Certainly, we can look at actuarial tables, such as those used by insurance companies and social security, to calculate life expectancy. These charts show that a male age 60 might be expected to live another 22 years; a female age 60, another 25 years. However, we suggest you not use these actuarial tables. Harvard Professor David Sinclair‘s “Lifespan- Why we Age- and Why We Don’t Have To” shows that the increases in technology and medicine are going to give those individuals who want to live a longer and healthier life the opportunity to do so. It is very possible that many of our clients and friends will live a healthy 100 plus years and younger generations, such as millennials and Gen Z, may live to 110 or longer. Accordingly, we suggest using an eventual age of at least 100 when doing your financial planning.

Dr. Sharpe’s final section in the book is about advice. He indicates that many people will need help. He outlines the “ideal financial advisor” and compares a “good financial advisor” to a “fine family doctor” who has “deep scientific knowledge, can assess client needs, habits and willpower and is able to provide scientific diagnoses and can communicate results to the client in simple terms so that the best treatments can be applied.” We like the analogy, we use it all the time.

Yes, running out of money in retirement would be a nasty, hard problem. It’s doesn’t have to be that way. You need a solid financial plan based on realistic values for investment returns and longevity. You also need to focus on spending and savings.   And, you might need some help from a “good financial advisor” that operates like a “fine family doctor,” a firm like DWM.

 

https://dwmgmt.com/

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History of Veterans Day

Written by Penn Boatwright.

veterans day 1

Happy belated Veterans Day! We hope everyone had a nice and safe Holiday! It is always great to bundle up this time of year and spend time reflecting on the sacrifices these men and women have made for us. As we enter the big holiday season, we should stay conscious of our Veterans while we enjoy time off and celebrate with our families.

My name is Penn Boatwright, and I am the new Client Services Associate for DWM Charleston. I recently graduated from Charleston Southern University with a Marketing degree, and feel so blessed to be a member of the Detterbeck team. I spend my free time dancing, teaching dance classes, volunteering and ‘learning’ to cook. I look forward to meeting some of you face-to-face, but today, I will be discussing the history of Veterans Day!

World War I, back then known as ‘The Great War’, ended on June 28, 1919, when the Treaty of Versailles was signed in France. However, the fighting came to a halt months earlier when an armistice (temporary cessation of hostilities) between the Allied Nations and Germany went into action. This happened on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, making November 11 the ‘End of the war, to end all wars.’

In November 1919, President Wilson introduced November 11 as the first celebration of Armistice Day with the following quote: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude of the victory. Both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…’

In 1938, Armistice Day became an official legal holiday dedicated to the cause of world peace, escalating from the original concept of parades and celebrations for the soldiers. The holiday was created to honor the veterans of World War I, but after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of military in US history, Congress amended the act and changed it in 1954 to honor all veterans as “Veterans Day!”

Veterans Day continues to be celebrated on November 11, staying true to the significant date that changed the world back in 1918. It is important we always remember that Veterans Day is a celebration to honor America’s veterans for their sacrifices, brave hearts, and willingness to serve. A BIG THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR VETERANS!

 

https://www.dwmgmt.com/

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DAFs, QCDs, Roths and 2019 Tax Planning-2020 is Coming

Written by Les Detterbeck.

2020 Tax Planning Coming

Hope everyone had a great Halloween. Now, it’s time to finish your 2019 Tax Planning. You know the drill. You can’t extend December 31st- it’s the last day to get major tax planning resolved and implemented. This year we will focus on three key areas; Donor Advised Funds, Qualified Charitable Distributions and Roth accounts. And, then finish with some overall points to remember.

Donor Advised Funds (“DAFs”). For charitable gifts, this simple, tax-smart investment solution has become a real favorite, particularly starting in 2018. The concept of DAFs is that taxpayers can contribute to an investment account now and get a current deduction yet determine in the future where and when the money will go.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 increased the standard deduction (up to $24,400 in 2019 for married couples). Couples with itemized deductions less than the standard deduction receive no tax benefit from their contributions. However, they could get a benefit by “bunching” their contributions using a DAF.   For example, if a couple made annual charitable contributions of $10,000 per year, they could contribute $40,000 to the DAF in 2019, e.g., and certainly, in that case, their itemized deductions would exceed the standard. The $40,000 would be used as their charity funding source over the next four years. In this manner, they would receive the full $40,000 tax deduction in 2019 for the contribution to the account, though they will not receive a deduction in the years after for the donations made from this account.

Now, what’s really great about a DAF is that if long-term appreciated securities are contributed to the DAF, you won’t have to pay capital gains taxes on them and the full fair market value (not cost) qualifies as an itemized deduction, up to 30% of your AGI. Why use after tax dollars for charity, when you can use appreciated securities?

Within the DAF, your fund grows tax-free. You or your wealth manager can manage the funds. The funds are not part of your estate. However, you advise your custodian, such as Schwab, the timing and amounts of the charitable donations. In general, your recommendations as donor will be accepted unless the payment is being made to fulfill an existing pledge or in a circumstance where you would receive benefit or value from the charity, such as a dinner, greens fees, etc.

Many taxpayers are using the DAF as part of their long-term charitable giving and estate planning strategy. They annually transfer long-term appreciated securities to a DAF, get a nice tax deduction, allow the funds to grow (unlike Foundations which have a 5% minimum distribution, there are no minimum distributions for DAFs) and then before or after their passing, the charities they support receive the benefits.

Qualified Charitable Distributions (“QCDs”). A QCD is a direct transfer of funds from your IRA to a qualified charity. These payments count towards satisfying your required minimum distribution (“RMD”) for the year. You must be 70 ½ years or older, you can give up to $100,000 (regardless of the RMD required) and the funds must come out of your IRA by December 31. You don’t get a tax deduction, but you make charitable contributions with pre-tax dollars. Each dollar in QCDs reduces the taxable portion of your RMD, up to your full RMD amount.

For taxpayers 70 ½ or older, their annual charitable contributions generally should be QCDs and if their gifting exceeds their RMDs, they can either do QCDs up to $100,000 annually or, instead of QCDs,fund a DAF with long-term appreciated securities and bunch the contributions to maximize the tax deduction.

Roth Accounts. A Roth IRA is a tax-advantaged, retirement savings account that allows you to withdraw your savings tax-free. Roth IRAs are funded with after-tax dollars. They grow tax-free and distributions of both principal and interest are tax-free. Roth IRAs do not have RMD requirements that traditional pre-tax IRAs have. They can be stretched by spouses and beneficiaries without tax. They are the best type of account that a beneficiary could receive upon your passing.

A taxpayer can convert an IRA to a Roth account anytime, regardless of age or income level- the IRS is happy to get your money. A Roth conversion is especially appealing if you expect to be in a higher marginal tax bracket in retirement. Conversions make sense when taxable income is low or negative. In addition, some couples interested in Roth conversions make DAFs in the same year to keep their taxes where they would have been without the conversion or the DAF.

2020 is coming. You still have almost two months to resolve your 2019 tax planning and get it implemented. Make sure you and your CPA review your situation before year-end to make sure you understand your likely tax status and review possible strategies that could help you. At DWM, we don’t prepare tax returns. However, we do prepare projections for our clients based on our experience and knowledge to help them identify key elements and potential strategies to reduce surprises and save taxes. Time is running out on 2019. Don’t forget to do your year-end tax planning. And, of course, contact us if you have any questions.

 

https://dwmgmt.com/

 

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